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Goal: To inform people of the health risks associated with indoor tanning.


Blog 1: I believe...


The tanning industry targets younger people with the idea of it making you "more attractive". If you are under the age of 18, I strongly disagree with the use of tanning beds. Most of the time, teenagers do not have enough knowledge about the risks and dangers of UV light directly hitting your skin in a tanning bed. Not only does tanning have a negative physical result but I believe it has an equally harmful mental effect. Teenagers are surrounded with ideas of what is "in" or "cool", most teenagers will do whatever they can in order to look the best. Most of my friends either tan regularly indoors or atleast have a few times. When I ask them if they know the effects of it, many are completely clueless and not interested. I wanted to blog about a topic that I believe many people could benefit from. I think the deadliest part of tanning beds is the fact that it does not have an immediate impact. The actions you do now can and will affect you later down the road. Teenagers, including myself, have a hard time grasping that concept which is why I believe legislation needs to take control of this issue to make further restrictions.
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Blog 2: Tanning Salons Lure Teens


I had thought the tanning industry was pathetic enough for luring teenagers through typical beauty myths but flat out lieing to them regarding their health is even worse.















Businesses are capable of getting away with these lies because teenagers won't know. How many teenagers do you know that are THAT interested in their health to do a little research to find the facts. Aren't we invincible anyways? The article explains how your risk of melanoma increases 75% when tanning bed use begins before the age of 30. Despite the horrifying truth about tanning salons displayed in this article, it is nice to see that some people are starting to do something about it. We are slowly starting to realize that this habit among our children will be extremely detrimental in the long run.
Now, some House Democrats, such as Calif. Rep. Henry Waxman, are urging the Food and Drug Administration to consider reclassify tanning beds as unsafe for minors.



Source:
"Probe: Tanning Salons Lure Teens with Lies." CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 01 Feb. 2012. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57369431/probe-tanning-salons-lure-teens-with-lies/>.


Blog 3:Tanning beds are a known carcinogen


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What a coincidence...the article starts off with a typical sad story about a young girl who is now paying the price from her indoor tanning habits. Meghan Rothschild is fighting the deadliest form of skin cancer, Melonoma. The article explains how people will have a much greater chance of having skin cancer when they use tanning beds before the age of 35. The fact that 70% of indoor tanners are female makes me cringe. Are females as a whole that obsessed with such a meaningless attribute to your body? Females in society are very pressured to make decisions regarding their physical look. Many are not aware that how "young" and "good" you look now will be completely different come 10 years later.
"Since one American dies of melanoma about every hour, it's imperative that young people avoid deliberately seeking a tan," said C. William Hanke, MD, MPH, FAAD, president of the Academy. "The Academy is committed toward reaching young women with this potentially life-saving message." With the facts so easily displayed here, you really can't argue against the harmful effects. It is reassuring to see that some doctors are on board with the situation and are actively working to inform young women.

Current estimates show one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. It is confirmed that tanning beds are a known carcinogen. If we know these astounding statistics, we would be foolish to ignore it.


Source:
"Indoor Tanning Is Not As Safe As You Think - In Fact, It's Totally Out." Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, 07 May 2008. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/106362.php>.

Blog 4:Proposed NYS Legislation


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In Albany, the debate on teen tanning is extremely active. The article here states that representatives from multiple organizations such as, The American Cancer Society are showing support in the pending legislation to ban minors from indoor tanning facilities. Currently, NYS minors 14 and older are allowed to tan with parental consent. This may sound like a helpful law, but many parents may be users of a tanning facility therefore allowing access for their children. Parents may also be unaware of the danger they are potentially putting their kids in. I personally believe the decision should be made in the eyes of the government when it comes to something as serious as your health. If the facts weren't so clear, I could understand room for argument. According this article, the bill has been passed by the NYS Assembly and advocates are hoping to see it passed in the senate. Scott Hangauer, was diagnosed with Melonoma at the age of 25. Scott says that he went tanning everyday in high school. He had to undergo surgery on his neck and long hours of chemotherapy. Dr. Ilene Rothman stated, "I'm seeing more melanoma patients under 30 in my practice." If doctors are starting to notice a spark in numbers like that, then it is time to start doing something about it. If we also know a major reason for the dramatic change, why wouldn't we put an end to it? Why would we continue to let it happen? Some argue that moderation is key, just like everything in life. This is true, although I don't think teenagers should have the ability to decide what is moderate.


Source:
"Proposed NYS Legislation Would Ban Indoor Tanning for Teens." WKBW News 7: News, Sports, Weather. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.wkbw.com/news/local/Proposed-NYS-Legislation-Would-Ban-Indoor-Tanning-for-Teens-149932025.html>.


Blog 5:Tanorexia



The study conducted by researchers at Memorial Cancer Center had astonishing results. I had no idea that young people who frequently use indoor tanning facilities are more likely to have drug and alcohol dependency, as well as a susceptibility to depression. This fact amazed me. I can't believe I am still finding more and more health effects due to tanning. Tanning addicted college students involved in the study reported a much greater use of alcohol and ddrug-addiction.jpgrugs along with higher levels of anxiety. Many organizations preach moderation in reference to tanning. Though this may be true, liquor companies advocate the same thing and we see people everyday who are addicted to alcohol. Research from Wake Forest University in 2006 stated that frequent sun goers experience real withdrawal symptoms when going cold turkey. It sounds to me like tanning is as real and powerful as any other addiction! (alcohol, tobacco, other drugs) Your body can become dependent on endorphin surges and will find it difficult to go without them. The physiological part of it is terrifying as well, tanning is just becoming another way for sufferers to attempt to conceal flaws. I hope people start thinking of tanning addiction in the same complexity as other addictions.




Source:
"Tanorexia – Addiction to Indoor Tanning - Health Conditions - Celebrities with Diseases." Tanorexia – Addiction to Indoor Tanning. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.celebrities-with-diseases.com/health-conditions/tanorexia-%E2%80%93-addiction-to-indoor-tanning-5104.html>.


Blog 6: Tanning restrictions


This article on the National Conference of State Legislatures website provides the tanning restrictions for minors in all states. From Arizona to Wyoming, there is a variety of different restrictions. At least 31 states regulate the use of tanning facilities by minors. California currently bans the use of tanning beds for all minors under 18. I think this will slowly start a trend for many other states as we continue to see health problems in our youth. Recent recommendations from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a subsidiary of the World Health Organization, state, "Policymakers should consider enacting measures, such as prohibiting minors and discouraging young adults from using indoor tanning facilities, to protect the general population from possible additional risk for melanoma. Policy makers have to start doing something to stop this. How many more diagnoses of melanoma do we need before we start taking action? In 2012, the American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates that there will be 76,250 new cases of melanoma in the United States and 9,180 deaths from the disease. The article shows how New York allows tanning those 14-17 years old with parental consent and also requires eye protection. What about skin protection? Your skin should be just as important to you as your eyes. Policy makers need to start OPENING THEIR EYES.


Tanning Restrictions For Minors--State Laws

Updated May 2012

State
Statute
Ban
Parental Accompaniment
Parental Permission
Other
Arizona
Ariz. Admin. Code R12-1-1414 A2
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
Operator must limit exposure time to manufacturer's recommendation; provide eye protection.
Arkansas
Ark. Stat. Ann. § 20-27-2202
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
N/A
California
Cal. Bus. and Prof. Code

§ 22706 of, and adds Section 2241.3 (As of Jan. 1, 2012)
Under 18
N/A
N/A
As of Jan. 1, 2012, CA is the first state in the nation to ban use of UV indoor tanning beds for ALL minors under 18.
Connecticut
Conn. Gen. Stat. § 19a-232
N/A
N/A
Under 16
N/A
Delaware
Del. Code Ann. tit. 16 § 30D
Under 14; unless medically necessary.
Under 14
Between 14 and 18, in person; valid for 12 months.
N/A
Florida
Fla. Stat. Ann.

§ 381.89 (1998)
N/A
Under 14
Between 14 and 18; agrees to wear eye protection.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide eye protection.
Georgia
Ga. Code Ann.

§ 31-38-8 (1996)
N/A
N/A
Between 14 and 18, in person.
Operator must provide eye protection.
Illinois
Ill. Admin. Code

Title 77; Sec. 795.190 (c)
Under 14
N/A
Between 14 and 17, in person.
Operator must provide eye protection.
Indiana
Ind. Code Ann. § 25-8-15.4-15 and 16
N/A
Under 16
Under 18, in person.
Operator must limit time to administrative or manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide eye protection.
Kentucky
Ky. Rev. Stat. § 217.922
N/A
Under 14
Between 14 and 17; agrees to wear eye protection; valid for 12 months.
N/A
Louisiana
La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §

40:2701 to 40:2718 (2005)
N/A
Under 14
Between 14 and 17, in person; agrees to wear eye protection.
Operator must limit time to administrative or manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide eye protection.
Maine
10-144 Dept. of Human Services ch. 223 12A (3)(f)
Under 14
14 and 15
14 and older, in person; valid for 12 months.
Operator must limit time to administrative or manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Maryland
Md. Health Code Ann. § 20-106
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
N/A
Massachusetts
Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 111 Public Health § 211
N/A
Under 14
14 to 17
Operator must limit time to administrative maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Michigan
Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. § 333.13405
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
Operator must require eye protection.
Minnesota
Minn. Stat. Ann. § 325H.08
N/A
N/A
Under 16, in person.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Mississippi
Department of Health Regulations
N/A
Under 14
Between 14 and 17, in person.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
New Hampshire
N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § tit. XXX 313-A:31
Under 14; unless medically necessary.
Under 14
Under 18, in person; valid for 12 sessions.
N/A
New Jersey
N.J. Rev. Stat. § C. 26:2D-82.1
Under 14
N/A
14 through 17.
Operator must limit time to administrative maximum exposure recommendation; require eye protection.
New York
N.Y. Public Health Law § 3555
Under 14
N/A
Between 14 and 17, in person; valid for 12 months, agrees to wear eye protection.
Operator must require eye protection.
North Carolina
N.C. Gen. Stat. § 104E-9.1
15A NCAC 11 .1418
Under 13; unless medically necessary.
N/A
Under 18
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide eye protection.
North Dakota
N.C. Cent. Code § 23-39
Under 14; unless medically necessary.
Under 14
Under 18, in person; valid for 12 months.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Ohio
Ohio Admin. Code 4713-19-09 (B)
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person; valid for number of tanning sessions as specified by parent.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide eye protection.
Oregon
OAR 333-119-0090 (2)
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Rhode Island
Department of Health Rules and Regulations for the Registration of Tanning Facilities Part III; Sec. 9.5
N/A
N/A
Under18, in person.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
South Carolina
S.C. Code Ann. § ch. 61, sec. 106-4.5
N/A
N/A
Under 18, in person.
Operator must provide and require eye protection.
Tennessee
Tenn. Code Ann. § 68-117-104
N/A
Under 14
Under 18, in person .
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Texas
Tex. Health and Safety Code Ann. § 145.008
Under 16.5.
N/A
Under 18, in person; agrees to wear eye protection.
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Utah
SB 41, 2012 (goes into effect May 8, 2012 as 26-15-13)
N/A
Under 18
Under 18, in person; with signed permission slip or order from physician.
Operator must provide and require eye protection.
Vermont
__H 157__
Under 18
N/A
N/A
Bans use of UV tanning beds by minors under 18. VT is the second state to pass such legislation.
Virginia
Va. Code § 59.1-310.3
N/A
N/A
Under 15; valid for 6 months.
N/A
Wisconsin
Wis. Code Ann. § 255.08 (9)(a)
Under 16
N/A
N/A
Operator must limit time to manufacturer's maximum exposure recommendation; provide and require eye protection.
Wyoming
Enrolled Act 36, 2010
N/A
Under 15
Between 15 and 18, in person; valid for 12 months.
N/A
Source: Aim at Melanoma, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and NCSL- Powered by StateNet, 2012.


Source:
Indoor Tanning Restrictions for Minors - A State-by-State Comparison." Tanning Restrictions for Minors. Web. 22 May 2012. http://www.ncsl.org/issues-research/health/indoor-tanning-restrictions-for-minors.aspx.

Blog 7: Why are teens tanning?


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According to a new survey by the American Academy of Dermatology, teenagers are tanning to "look good." I'd say that's about the only reason most of my friends tan. We all see how beautiful actors and models on T.V or in a magazine look with bronzed skin. We want to look like that. Is it really worth it to sacrifice your skin in order to look a certain way?
"Unfortunately, when it comes to teens, vanity rules out every time," said Dr. Rigel. "If the perception is that a tan makes them look better, then teens will bask in the sun without protection to achieve one. What's ironic is that a tan is fleeting, whereas the scars and disfigurement that often occur from skin cancer are permanent." I completely agree with Dr. Rigel's argument. Teenagers need to realize that the consequences of tanning are no where near worth it. Your tan will fade and you will most likely return back to the tanning booth again, and again, and again. Every time you do, your chances of skin cancer increase dramatically. Soon you won't have any more chances. Odds of avoiding skin cancer for these people will not be in their favor. Skin cancers rates will continue to sky rocket until we see a change in teen behavior.




Source:
"Teens Know Sun Exposure Is Dangerous, Yet Most Still Want a Tan." Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, 05 Mar. 2005. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/23773.php>.

Blog 8: Melanoma patients regret indoor tanning


"That's not going to affect me", was the reaction from Samantha Hessel regarding the risk of indoor tanning. She began going to salons before her freshman prom and continued to return before dances, the beach season, and other opportunities. At the age of 19, Samantha learned that the mole on her elbow was melanoma. Just like many melanoma survivors, Samantha Hessel is now speaking out. She is lucky that her tumor was caught early enough to cure through surgery. It is great that survivors are able to take a terrible, frightening experience, and be able to turn it into something positive by talking to others about their stories and raising money. 35% of 17 year old girls use tanning machines, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The link between tanning and cancer is so blatantly clear. People who use tanning beds are 74% more likely to develop cancer. Everyone as a whole needs to raise more of an alarm and address the issue directly. Teenagers are especially resistant to hearing about health risks. I hope that people start spreading awareness to help stop this growth in diagnoses. I believe parents have an important role to educate their children in order to keep them away from salons. The should be engaging in the same exact conversations they do for smoking, drinking, and sex. This education may also change the image that tans are beautiful. The idea of tanned skin being an attractive attribute will continue to cause health risks until it is changed. If this change in perception cannot be fixed, teenagers should use bronzing lotions or sprays instead of harming their skin.images.jpeg


Source:
Szabo, Liz. "Young Melanoma Patients Regret Indoor Tanning." USA Today. Gannett. Web. 22 May 2012. <http://www.usatoday.com/LIFE/usaedition/2011-05-18-Tanning18_ST_U.htm>.